Tips for Becoming a Stronger Paddler

One of the best ways to become a stronger paddler is to just go out there and paddle. Nothing beats hands-on training and endurance. But if you are really serious about becoming a stronger paddler, then you can do some strength training complemented with supplements. Here are some tips for becoming stronger paddler.

paddling

Paddle. Like what we’ve stated earlier, nothing beats getting your hands wet by actually paddling and training yourself. You’ll then be able to determine which part of your body you’ll need to work out in order to improve your paddling strength. If you have the time to go into the water and paddle, don’t hesitate! Repetition is the key to success and there’s nothing that beats paddling itself to train your body to become a stronger paddler.

Cardio. If you didn’t know, paddling is a cardio exercise. That means anything that improves your cardiovascular strength can also help you become a stronger paddler. Running, cycling, aerobic workouts and even just walking your dog are cardiovascular workout. In addition to that, cardio workouts boosts endurance, allowing you to paddle more and gain more strength!

Workout. Although paddling is the best way to make you a stronger paddler, you can’t just be paddling all the time. But there are certain workouts that can help you improve your paddling strength and keep your muscles lubricated to prevent performance degradation. There are multiple workouts that can help you become a stronger paddler and also to maintain your muscles. Here are some exercises to become a stronger paddler.

  • One arm lateral pull downs – Your feet shoulder width apart and your position balanced your arm by your side and its opposite at head height on the cable machine. Pull down the cable and then do the other arm, repeat the cycle. This is a great exercise to improve core and paddle strength.
  • Triceps pulls – with your feet shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, stand facing away from the cable machine and hold the cables or resistance bands over your shoulder. Pull your hands forward until they extend in front of your head. Once fully extended, maintain your body position for a while before slowly returning to the starting position. This is a great exercise to strengthen your triceps.
  • Bosu ball kettle swing – stand on a bosu ball with your legs shoulder-width apart in a slightly crouched position, your back straight and your hands holding a kettle bell between your legs. Swing the kettle ball forward, upward up to head level while maintaining a straight arm, back and body balance. Return to the starting position and then repeat. This is a full body exercise that develops strength and stability in the shoulder and core.

Those are just some of the basic workout to help you become a stronger paddler.

Fitness Tips for Paddling Sports

Staying in Shape During the Off-Season

For those who live in climates that do not provide good water conditions year-around, it can be difficult to stay in paddling-shape during the off-season. Even if you do live in a location where you can paddle year-round, perhaps you’re looking for ways to supplement your fun with workouts that will help you reach optimal fitness for your particular sport.

Therefore, we would like to outline a couple tips and tricks that we have learned over the years that can help you stay in paddling-shape no matter what time of year.

We have listened to the experiences of many paddle athletes, from surfers to kayakers, and have found that whole-body workouts involving your own body weight are beneficial to paddle sport-specific conditioning. This allows for a great balance between cardio and resistance training, and usually these workouts involve multi-joint exercises that require you to engage your core no matter what.

Before we go into too much detail, we first need to identify what the key disadvantages to these types of workout would be. First, it can difficult to motivate yourself to do these types of workouts on your own, and hiring a personal trainer can be expensive. Second, they often aren’t any fun. Lastly, it can be difficult to tell if you’re making much progress, especially if you are taking a break from the water for a prolonged period of time.

All this being said, we have found a solution that addresses most of these points and that many paddle sport athletes have found beneficial in more ways than one. Keep in mind, this isn’t for everyone, but is definitely worth considering. So what’s the solution? Boxing. If you’re surprised, that’s normal, we were too when we first heard of other athletes’ success stories, but here is why it makes sense.

First off, boxing is cheap. Most gyms will only require a minimal membership fee and usually provide equipment for use, but often recommend you get your own pair of boxing gloves at some point. If you don’t want to be at a gym or don’t want to continually pay membership fees, it can be quite easy to get the main equipment for your own home, like punching bags and simple punching bag stands or hangers.

Most importantly, boxing is a crazy workout. They make it look easy on TV, sometimes even boring, but it’s truly one of the most challenging workouts I have personally ever participated in. Don’t worry, most gyms don’t require you to fight, although you can usually work your way up to sparring if you wish. However, minus the actual combat, workouts for both recreational and competitive boxers follows a very similar structure, one that resembles circuit training and targets all muscle groups, while continuously taxing your cardiovascular system.

For those who are involved in paddle sports, you will know that core stability and shoulder strength/endurance are particularly key aspects of the sport-specific fitness. Although the exercises involved in a boxing workout vary, you will always be targeting your core and shoulders. The core is targeted through the stance, movement, and punching techniques, and they also focus on this during exercises that aren’t boxing-specific. Additionally, keeping your hands up by your face for a long time and constantly throwing punches is way more difficult than you would think, and you will see gains to your shoulder strength and endurance almost immediately.

Other areas that I personally noticed were very strongly worked were my calves, back, and chest. In fact, I was surprised at how sore my lats were after my first boxing workout, and I think it was just from the variety of movements and focusing on pulling my hands back to my face after throwing punches, but all in the proper technique.

Lastly, it’s a fun alternative to putting a mat on your floor and doing push-ups and sit-ups. It’s way easier to motivate yourself to do a really challenging workout when it’s fun, and when you can track changes in fitness and skill. Boxing offers all of this. Of course, it may not be for everyone, but if it’s something you think is worth considering, we recommend simply checking out local boxing clubs and getting their thoughts as well.