Snorkeling Spots in the World Accessible by Kayak

Have you been planning to pack your snorkel and fins and head over to the world and discover the best diving spots accessible by kayak? Armed only with the best snorkeling fins, you can easily discover the best spots in the world with a lowly vessel like a kayak. There are a lot of spots all over the world for this. If you have been in the office for some time, don’t you think its time to pack your bag and head over the best diving places in the world?

 

Some of the Best Snorkeling Spot the World Over

 

If you’re itching to slip on your snorkel and explore the life underwater, I can assure that these places will blow your mind away. Just make sure to book ahead of time because other like-minded folks will sure be there ahead of you.

  1. Mejangan Island, Bali—Know for its dramatic wall diving sites, the Menjangan Island is located within the National Park known as Bali Barat. Due to a current that carries rich nutrients, this island is teeming with wild sea life including a huge variety of fishes and corals. If you only have one place to go, it should be this place.

  2. Hanuama bay, Hawaii—Sheltered from current and waves, this volcanic crater island is home to a huge variety of underwater flora and fauna. If you love snorkeling in undisturbed water, this is the place to be. If you just want to relax, its calm shallow water is also perfect for it.

  3. Buck Island, US Virgin Island—Located at the northeast coast of Saint Croix, Buck Island is one of the few US marine national parks that teams with underwater wildlife. It stretches for hundreds of square miles of coral reefs and you can almost imagine what you can find in this vast island.

  4. Silver Bank, Dominican Republic—If snorkeling with huge sea creatures is your thing, then head over to the Silver Bank, Dominican Republic. Easily around 5000 to 7000 humpback whales pass by this place every year and it’s hard to miss them when they’re around. The Silver Bank, Dominican Republic has been declared a whale sanctuary since 1986 and that’s why whales can pass by here without the possibility of being harmed.

  5. Captain Cook Monument, Hawaii—Named after Captain Cook because this is where the old captain died when he met a skirmish with the Hawaiian natives, this place is only accessible through kayak or on foot. It is home to a lot of spinner dolphins but since the corals are so delicate, it is better to visit here with a guided tour. Make sure to be sensitive to the place so as not to leave so much waste.

Are you ready to take that diving and kayaking adventure? Make sure to stay fit because this places will demand your energy. If you need prescription snorkeling mask, have yourself checked because there’s just too many things to see in these places too.

Stand-up Paddle Boarding – Brief Introduction

One of the quickest growing watersport in the World, stand up paddle boarding is developing very fast. You can do it on any body of water from seas, lakes, rivers and bay – even a swimming pool if it’s huge enough. It’s an incredible full body core workout and is an even better approach to experience the water in the outdoors. Individuals of all ages, skill levels, and experience could be up and riding right away. There is even room to toss a little youngster or a dog on board.

The Inventor of Paddle Boarding

Maui surf legend Laird Hamilton was searching for an approach to cross train for enormous waves in the early 90’s. He got a canoe paddle and his longest surfboard and discovered paddling while upright to be an awesome workout. A lot of people erroneously accept he designed the sport of paddle boarding, however, its unique roots dates back over a huge number of years to ancient Hawaiian, Peruvian and African culture. Every one of the 3 culture had some type of paddle boarding, however, the Hawaiians are given the credit as the first to really surf waves with a paddle for actual sport and had a saying to depict surfing with a paddle as Hoe He’e nalu.

Paddle Boarding Gear

Stand-up paddle board – The way to discovering a decent fit is to talk with a certified paddleboard expert and try out the boards in the water before you purchase them to get an idea regarding how they handle. Wider, flatter boards are more stable, and a basic, all-around board for most guys has a tendency to be something like 12 feet to 12 feet 6 inches in length, for example, the Riviera Voyager. You’ll be spending at least $800 to $900 on a basic yet quality board. Purchasing a paddleboard is an investment, as is purchasing, say, a road bike, however it won’t lose its dollar value because you can always sell later.

Paddle: Stand up paddles differ, however most have a straight shaft with an angled blade whose size is specific to every person. A decent dependable guideline is to pick a paddle that is something like 10 inches taller than you in case you’re flat-water paddling. The grip ought to be at midpalm with shoulders square and hand extended overhead. A good paddle will cost you about $300-$400, yet you shouldn’t need to ever replace it.

PFD (Personal Flotation Device): The U.S. Coast Guard groups stand up paddleboards as vessels, so always wear a PFD whenever you’re paddling navigable water.

Standup Paddleboard Leash: Maybe one of the most imperative pieces of equipment is the leash, the thing that connects you to your board. For any paddler, this little thing can mean the difference life and death. If you find yourself tired and you’re still a long way from shore, the leash will keep your board inside your reach if you fall in. Even in a light breeze, your board will go out of your reach in seconds.